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Posts Tagged ‘SCI Show’

An introduction to the Three Amigos on Safari in 2018

As the unofficial “Leader of the Three Amigos”, I will take the liberty of kicking off this series of hunter blogs.  There will be a story from each of the “Three Amigos” in his own words.  Each has a unique tale to tell of their incredible hunts and experiences on safari.

This year completes my 8th safari with John X Safaris.   I’ve been asked many times why would you go on 8 safaris?  I’ve been asked more often why you would go back to the same outfitter on safari in South Africa?

To use a South Africa expression:  “Every safari with John X has been over the moon” and has exceeded all expectations.   More importantly, every experience consisted of completely different hunts, entirely different species in completely different areas, with new friends and family along on each journey.

One of the reasons for my multiple safaris is the great joy of sharing the safari experience with someone who has never been to Africa.   After three years toasting the prospects of chasing a great buffalo, two of my closest friends committed to a hunt with John X Safaris in 2018.  This, the first installment, is a story from the eyes of “Amigo Mike”, on his first ever African safari.

“The only man I envy is the man who has not yet been to Africa – for he has so much to look forward to.” – Richard Mullin

Mike’s Story – An African Safari through the eyes of a “first timer”

Despite seeing the photos and hearing the stories, I’m not sure that you can ever be prepared for Africa.  The land is so vast.  There is so much game with so many species.  And the people are the most incredible hosts I’ve ever met.  Hopefully my story will give you some perspectives and appreciation of the experience from the eyes of a first timer.

 No one can prepare you for the first sights and sounds of Africa….


I met Chris through my lifelong friend Randy.  I started helping Chris take care of his acreage and we quickly became friends.  When we started gathering as couples to share weekend dinners, inevitably the guys would end up in Chris’ safari room.   Over many sessions of toasting his safari exploits with fine port, I continued to hear the incredible stories from Randy and Chris about Africa and their experiences with John X Safaris.

Like most hunters in the heartland of the US, I had always dreamed of seeing Africa.  Like most, I felt that I could never manage to go on a safari to hunt.   But after hearing about the incredible experiences, they seduced me into realizing my dream of going with them, and joining in “The Great Adventures of Three Amigos on Safari”!

I have been on a number of “guy trips” hunting and fishing.  Normally we fly into a very rustic cabin in the woods.  I was totally unprepared for the 5 Star safari camp of John X Safaris home base, Woodlands Safari Estate.   Incredible accommodations and even more amazing food.   I would quickly see why Randy and Chris brought their wives on safari with them.  The experience for the non-hunter/observer is just incredible.

Like most first time dreamers in Africa, my top species were kudu and gemsbok.   Carl assured me that we would get to those in the Great Karoo, as he wanted me to experience the challenge of hunting free range kudu in the high country.  I had no idea what I was in for.

Before hunting kudu, I had the opportunity to hunt plains game at Woodlands.  One specie that intrigued me was the bushbuck, I wanted to hunt bushbuck, the “mini kudu”.   I had no concept of how challenging it would be to find them in the bush.   After multiple days of stalking and belly crawling, my PH Clayton came through with a magnificent bushbuck that we truly earned!  And his 7 month old Jack Russel, aka “Beans”, saved the day by finding the bushbuck as darkness closed in around us.  As an aside, with no city lights you have no idea of how dark it really gets in the African bush!

Thanks to my PH Clayton and his perseverance! I had no idea of how challenging a bushbuck would be.

For a mid-west hunter in the US, you harvest a deer and you are done for the season.  It was incredible to go out every day and hunt for something new.  And the “hunt” was real in every sense.  The land is immense, filled with brush and rocks.  It is incredible to glass, finally find the animals, and then figure out how to stalk them, with no guarantee of seeing them after hours of perseverance.

This magnificent blesbuck is a beautiful plains game trophy and was an incredible hunt on the open plains.

As it turned out, Carl had the perfect plan for a first timer.  I had the opportunity to hunt and harvest bushbuck, blue wildebeest, blesbuck, and zebra before going to the mountains.  In retrospect, I would not have been ready to jump right into the challenge of a free range kudu from day one.   Each hunt provided a unique situation and much-needed experience before heading to the expanse of the Great Karoo.  My advice to a first timer is to allow yourself plenty of time.  There is no guarantee that you will see your preferred specie on any given day … my bushbuck took several mornings and evenings.

The Great Karoo – Big Sky Country and home of incredible Kudu and Gemsbok!

Spotting game is not the hard part, stalking them from over a mile away is a supreme Karoo challenge…

I’m told that South Africa is home to over 47 different species of antelope. But you quickly learn that different species require different habitat.  Since I wanted a gemsbok, we needed to head north, to the dry country where these beautiful animals thrive under harsh conditions. We packed our bags and headed north to experience an entirely new area, and completely different hunting conditions in the mountains. I thought I was fit, but as you can see from the photo, hunting this terrain takes everything you have.

I don’t begin to know how to describe the Great Karoo.  It is immense.  Truly BIG sky country.  The closest thing in the US is probably some of the elk country in the western mountains of the US.   In the Karoo you can literally see for miles … and the PHs often glass and spot the trophies you will hunt well over a mile away.  The stalk can literally take many hours, requiring climbing up and down rocks and valleys.  It is pure fair chase pursuit at its finest.

My PH Louwrence deserves the credit for an incredible stalk that resulted in a monster “pig”.

I did manage to harvest my gemsbok on my last day of hunting the north, along with a fantastic warthog.   Both were worthy hunts requiring long stalks and incredible stealth.  The gemsbok required a long shot of over 450 yards … there was just no other way to get closer across a deep ravine.   The entire camp had to literally pitch in and pack out the gemsbok in quarters.  Amazing teamwork was truly a large part of my safari.  Absolutely nothing went to waste.

There are hunts … and then there is hunting the Grey Ghost.

I was told that kudu are known as the“grey ghost” of Africa, because of their ability to vanish into thin air right before your eyes.  I can now testify how difficult it is to hunt kudu, especially in the Karoo.  While all my hunts were fantastic in their own right, my kudu hunt was literally a two-day long adventure!

I had the opportunity to hunt kudu with Carl, truly a master PH.  Our hunt included incredible spotting, stalking, and crawling to get into position. I literally had to pick cactus out of my backside for days after the hunt!  Then there was the anxiety of waiting for literally an hour to get a shot.   I can’t begin to describe the roller coaster ride of emotions that took place over the course of the hunt, and finally connecting with my bull up in the mountains.

And wow, what tremendous fortune to have Pierre (aka Ozzy) from Got the Shot Productions along to video the hunt!  He is an amazing videographer and athlete carrying the camera gear.   Fortunately, he put together video highlights so that I do not have to begin to try to tell the entire story of the kudu adventure.  I have not seen it yet, so I can’t wait to see the video shared for the first time in this blog.  Ozzy is a great editor, and his video will most assuredly tell the story and bring all the memories flooding back from that incredible day in the mountains.

Suffice to say that I now know why Chris has been on 8 safaris with John X Safaris.  I completed 8 hunts on my first safari, and all of them were uniquely different and exciting.  However, capturing a monster Grey Ghost on his turf in the mountains of the Karoo is simply beyond anything imagined. 

Special thanks to Carl, Louwrence, Ozzy, Clayton and all the amazing John X staff for my incredible experience.  I’ve been bitten, and smitten by the “safari bug”.   The trophies will be so incredible that I have already drawn up plans to build a safari room in my basement.  Now we will have another “slice of Africa” in Nebraska where we can drink fine port and toast the incredible memories with John X Safaris.

The new Safari Addict, Mike

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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When the matriarch of a family speaks, you listen. This was the case when Aunt Karen Nelsen approached me on the morning of April 7’th. She’s a grand lady, an old school woman with a certain class of style and grace about her that reminds me of my grandmother. Like each morning before, I headed down the verandah at Woodlands Safari Estate where she met me in mid-stride; “Carl.. On a scale of 1 to 100, this was a 1000.” And that’s all she needed to say.

It had been a marathon safari for the Nelsen’s starting with a tour down the Garden Route, between Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, before embarking on a short hunt from our southern base. The goal was to afford each family member, no matter how young or old the individual, the opportunity to experience something he or she wanted to experience on tour, and then have each hunt their first big game animal in Africa.

The Nelsen’s are no ordinary people. They’re a dynamic family led by Uncle Kevin, Jason and Phil. Aunt Karen, together with Tracey and Paige are the glue of this unit, and the kids are the true characters. Join them on their fun-filled 8 days at John X Safaris.

Could there be a better family vacation?

 

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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If you have ever visited John X Safaris at SCI’s National Convention over the past ten to fifteen years then you may have had the pleasure to meet Brett Nelson. He’s the quiet guy with the big smile, always there, but never wanting to be in the way, while we tend to the many friends who stop by to say hi or book their next adventure. He’s the kind of guy every succesful team needs. Nothing is too much to ask and the word “no” is not part of his vocabulary. He’s that guy you call.. when you only have one call.

He has become such an integral part of our family that he has his very own slot on our calendar each year. During the early season, towards the end of March, when you could just about assure him the summer rains had come and the areas have been undisturbed since the end of the previous season. It’s been like that for as long as we can remember.

Brett is an avid hunter who hates traveling alone. His enjoyment of sharing his piece of paradise with fellow hunters is what gives him great pleasure, while personally after eleven safaris to the East Cape, it would be fair to say the hunting is no longer his number one priority. He’s all about the camaraderie, the fun and laughter along the way, and the experiences with the many friends he has brought along on safari over the years. This year proved to be no exception with a crew made up of old friends returning on their second safari, as well as a few first timers.

Todd Ingstad was back on his second hunt to John X Safaris, teaming up with PH, Martin Neuper, making for a formidable team. Plains game would be the oder of the day, while Todd took his opportunities on a number of fantastic animals.

His Cape Eland would ensure the amazing start we have enjoyed on this specie for 2018 would continue on in style. It’s been a long time since we’ve seen or hunted bulls like this. Todd quite literally made a “pig” of himself with his epic Cape Eland.

This is not your everyday kind of bull. For the Eland connoisseur it will leave you in awe, grasping for both words and air, while at the same time trying to fathom the sheer enormity of this animal. A dream trophy…

For Luther Dietrich it would be a return to his happy hunting grounds. A certain 10″ Vaal Rhebuck on a previous safari with PH, Carl van Zyl, had built a close bond between these two which has taken them on numerous safaris throughout Africa, with the most recent being a Lord Derby Eland in Cameroon.

This year there were many highlights, including an Impala that had us in jitters and a Sable that changed our plans without us even realizing it. It’s not hard to see why we couldn’t pass it up. Then there was the amazing Bushbuck hunt up in the forests of the high ground, and finally…we got our Ostrich. The “bird hunting” just about gave us the slip after a serious run-around for a number of days.

Luther also always adds a fun twist to any safari, this year, adding a Aoudad to his hunt. Most will be amazed to learn there are a number of Aoudad strongholds in the East Cape, most notably being a free-ranging herd of +-500 animals in the Stormberg Mountain range of the East Cape.

The sheep are spread out in groups all over the mountains and it is seldom that one will not see as many as 300 in a morning. They’re everywhere, but hunting them is a major challenge in an outer worldly kind of terrain. Huge rocky outcrops rise up above the lush green valley floors below with some rock ledges extending over a couple of miles without a break in the rock. Professional Hunters, Carl van Zyl and Ed Wilson, did their best to capture both the terrain and scenery as best they could via their PhoneSkope’s, as to give you an idea of the kind of hunt it is. The footage is the best we could muster up between us while trying to hunt these weary mountain dwellers. It’s an experience like few out there…

While Luther was making the most of the mountains, first timers Dan and Kathy Cotter, were embarking on their first hunt to Africa. Dan and PH, Rusty Coetzer, hunted hard from our southern and northern areas, while Kathy enjoyed a day visiting Addo Elephant Park with Trish. It’s been a long time since the ladies have seen so much on a single outing, making for a memorable trip.

For Dan and Rusty it would be early mornings and late evenings as they toiled hard to achieve their goals. Dan’s Warthog most certainly proved to be one of his and our favorites.

As for first timer Jack Cripe or fondly known as the “instigator”, there wouldn’t be much that could stand in the way of this man and fun. Jack epitomized someone who had decided he’d be having the time of his life before he even arrived. It’s rewarding guiding someone in that kind of mood, which intern gave PH, Ross “Stix” Hoole, the opportunity to provide an experience hard to plan, let alone know where next the journey may take one.

It provided Jack with a superb harvest of trophies combined with rewards from sun-up to late in the night each evening. It provided surprises along the way, most notably one of the trophies of the safari.

A beautiful Nyala with width, color and magnificent length.

Jack’s old friend, Scott Fontaine, who had joined us last on safari during 2013, teamed up once again with his PH and partner in crime, Greg Hayes. Scotty and Grego could be referred to as the “naughty kids” of the group, always getting up to mischief with untold amounts of fun along the way! They hunted hard, but they played even harder, in between racking up a superb bag of trophies.

And for the man who put this all together, who gave us the opportunity to share ten wonderful days on safari, the hunting gods came smiling as he took on a few more than usual. Together with PH, Ed Wilson, Brett hunted a superb Scimitar Horned Oryx, an old dark Giraffe bull, Vita-Darted a White Rhino and brought down the largest bird in the world, which Ed kindly reminded us cannot fly and for that reason did not count. No ways Wilson. Anything at 400 yards counts!

BUT the cherry on the cake was Brett’s Bushpig. Finally after having passed up on numerous opportunities over the years, always giving his fellow hunters the first chance at pigs, he committed to the process and Clayton’s unrelenting efforts and got his boar.

And what a pig it turned out to be!

Like we said, there was “some” hunting done by a fun-loving bunch of pranksters who left us grinning from ear to ear with stomach muscles in tatters from all the laughter along the way. They filled their tags with distinction and gave it horns from sun-up to well after midnight each evening. They lived, laughed and hunted, like there was no tomorrow.

And we can’t wait to do it all again come March 2019!

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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When the fist rains hit during late September last year and continued throughout the summer and into the new year, a true sense of optimism began brewing as the start of our season drew ever closer.

By the time early March arrived the East Cape was in full bloom to welcome Kevin Fain, his son Hunter, and Tim Rainwater with his sons, Connor and Austin.

Kevin had hunted with us previously many years ago, but this time round the focus was on Hunter. Like many first timers, Hunter was focused on plains game, with no specific preferences, hunting hard and taking what Africa gave him. Needless to say he enjoyed tremendous success on a superb bag of animals.

Kevin on the other hand wasn’t going to pass up on the opportunity of a lifetime when a huge Sable stepped out late one afternoon.

A well placed shot after a long stalk dropped the old brute in his tracks. And what a beauty he turned out to be.

While the Fain’s were hard at it, the Rainwater’s weren’t being left behind for one minute. As first timers to Africa their interests varied tremendously between the three of them making for an extraordinary safari in variety of both species and hunting terrain.

Tim and Austin were interested in the traditional big hitters, namely Kudu, Gemsbuck, Impala, Zebra and Wildebeest, which they dually achieved great success on.

Of course there were the usual unexpected ones, such as the ever impressive Nyala, and the crazy experiences along the way that makes the safari a memorable one. Don’t ask us…. Ask Austin about his exciting Kudu hunt.

But there was one particular hunt that blew us away, and that was Tim’s massive Cape Eland. It is very seldom that one finds an Eland bull in this class. The rare combination of color, dewlap, mop and horns, makes him the standout trophy of the trip for many of us. An incredible animal to say the least.

With Tim and Austin spending most of their time on the traditional species, it was Connor who surprised us most. Here was a youngster on his first safari to the dark continent… you’d expect him to be interested in Kudu? Right? Wrong! Not this young man. Instead he could tell you all about the biggest and the smallest, with an addiction for the Tiny 10.

We’d be driving along from one type of habitat to the next during the course of the safari and without ever discussing it he’d confidently share his knowledge on why that particular terrain or habitat would be an ideal spot to search for a particular specie. It was incredible seeing his passion for Africa. Something we had not witnessed in over 35 years of guiding.

So it was only fitting that he started off his African hunting career with a beautiful old Giraffe bull.

And from the biggest he went to the smallest. Hunting his first two species in his Tiny 10 collection. Both his Steenbuck and Common Duiker reached the magical 5” mark. No small feat on such small critters.

With that the safari was slowly but surely coming to an end. Everyone had just about achieved what they were wanting to when the second last evening rolled along. It was time for the much-anticipated Springhare hunt the boys were promised when they first booked the safari.

During midday the boys headed off with the trackers and cut their very own hunting sticks and then at nightfall we headed out with a spotlight for an evening of fun and laughter.

The proudest hare hunters in the world! All we can say is how relieved we were that no bones were broken along the way, but the stomach muscles are still the worse for wear after a comical evening watching the boys chase down the springhares on foot.

It proved to be the highlight for these three with the many others captured by the crew from Got The Shot Productions.

There were far too many experiences along the way to mention or have captured them all, but for these two Dad’s it would be about their boys and the privilege of time spent together in Africa. We salute you for quite literally “passing the buck” to the next generation of hunters by affording them this unique opportunity. Neither you or they will forget their first big hunt. After all isn’t that what it’s all about?

Enjoy their safari with them. We couldn’t have asked for a better start…

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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As published in Gunwerks Long Range Magazine / Fall 2017 / Volume 3 / Issue 1

Over the past year I have come to notice a faction within our hunting community. It may be that it has always been there and that I have come to notice it even more so than before. Having purchased my very own Gunwerks 7 mm LRM it’s something I feel which needs tackling.

As an active African Professional Hunter/Outfitter I thought it fitting to share my view, in that matter my views, on the ethics around long-range hunting. It is and has become the Elephant in the room. Hunters are murmuring about it around camp fires, deer blinds, camp sites and safari lodges.

As a whole we have so many factors working against us as a collective hunting community that we cannot afford to ostracize hunters within our ranks. The very point of ethics is a hot topic of debate no matter where you find yourself around the world.  What is ethical for one may not be for another. Working out the exact science of ethics is something more personal than factual based, therein the reason for the debate.

Had you put me in the hot seat a mere five years ago and asked me for an opinion on the matter, I’m pretty sure my answer would have been something much different to what it is today. Back then I’m pretty certain it would have been something along the lines of what the greater community traditionally finds ethically acceptable. Will my opinion differ in ten years time?  Who knows? Time will tell.

At present I’m privileged to be guiding a number of long-range hunters each year, and one who has more than likely guided more than the average guide when it comes to long-range hunting.  With Africa’s unique specie options, lengthened hunting seasons, and varied terrains and countries on offer, I get around and have come to find an acceptable ethic within long-range hunting for myself, and it seems for many of the hunters I share a camp fire with.

Since getting my 7mm LRM I’ve spent more time at the range than the previous twenty years. I’m pretty certain I’ve shot out 600/700 rounds trying to prepare for that exact moment when everything stops and its only me, my rifle, and a certain Klipspringer I’ve dreamt about hunting for a long time. In all this time I’ve been trying to envisage the feeling my hunters experience when being guided onto a great trophy out on safari. How does the guy who comfortably shoots 250 or 500 yards feel before he breaks the shot? Let alone those who have mastered the 750 range and the true class acts who continuously exceed the 1000 yard mark. It’s not easy – That I can assure you.

These guys are practicing harder than ever before. They are mastering their skill and combining it with world-class technology pushing them to the next level. They are not pitching on a hunt and flinging lead across the country side at any given target – they’re calculated in their approach and tactic. I have seen those who refuse to use their Gunwerks rifle beyond the 300 yard mark as that is their comfortable ethical range. They don’t bend the rules just because their weapon is capable of performing beyond a 1000 yards. There are those who treat a 1000 yard shot as if it were a 200 yard setup. They continuously produce one shot kills year in and year out at those astounding ranges. That has become their ethical range.

What the Gunwerks long-range system has done for the trophy hunter is something quite unimaginable to describe, while it has opened the doors for many hunters at the twilight of their safari careers to continue traveling, hunting, and enjoying the great outdoors. It has often revived experiences that may not have been possible until now. Having personally witnessed the growth in Gunwerks as a company, a philosophy, and a people with ambitious developments, one can only imagine what more there is to come.

The exciting developments that Aaron and his team keep working on to enhance their product, and ultimately your experience, will see the boundaries being tested with a system that will only perform better and more efficiently going forward. What you choose to do with that technology will ultimately be up to you as an individual. Each and every one of us, who considers ourselves to be responsible hunters, will know and acknowledge our personal capabilities and choices to ensure an ethical kill is achieved at the end of the day. How you approach that journey and what you gain out of that experience will be up to you.

Is there a right or a wrong? An acceptable or unacceptable? My answer is a most definite no. Will I squeeze the trigger on that dream Klipspringer if the opportunity presents itself? I may or I may not. It won’t matter to me what a fellow hunter may think of my choice, it would ultimately all depend on the journey I personally took to arrive at that “right” setup. Would it matter to me at that moment if my Klipspringer was 50 or 500 yards out? Never! But that’s just me personally, and if you’re a hunter, you’ll know exactly what I mean.

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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Hello – Salibonani – Hallo – Dumela – Lumela – Xewane – Molweni – I nhlikanhi – Sawubona – Welcome to South Africa.

This country we call home is a vibrant place, it’s filled with the colors of the rainbow, a melting pot from all walks of life and tribe that live with a rhythm hard to describe or find anywhere else on earth. There’s something about getting back that excites the spirit as the cabin door opens and Africa flows back through your airways and into your blood. It is then that you know you’re back, you are back home.

The past six weeks have been a roller coaster of success, with the obvious turn in the US economy playing a major role in not only a revived economy, but a revived people willing and wanting to travel. The daily reception and hospitality enjoyed by our team while abroad continued to speak volumes about the American people and their generosity. Your continued support through hunting will ensure growth and sustainability of our wildlife in Africa. It is a model that is finally enjoying the support and recognition that for so long has been ignored. It seems that while the message has always been there, the importance of hunting on the Dark Continent has finally been proven through sustainable results. Hunters are not merely talking about conservation, they are being conservationists.

Arriving home we have turned our attention to the first hunts for the year, with a mere three week’s to go we’re scouting hard in preparation and anticipation of an exciting season ahead. Some areas are still dry, but the rains are here, and the majority of our hunting areas have been blessed with fantastic summer rains.

The game as always will amaze one, with their ability to recover from hard times the minute the countryside changes from dull and barren to lush and green. There are youngsters everywhere with each family group nurturing their young in their own unique way. Many of the old bulls/rams we feared for during the drought are still around, and amazingly so, in fantastic condition. Our trail cameras have been catching them throughout our areas, giving us great confidence going forward.

Between now and the start of our season be sure to follow our social media platforms as we continue to share more from our trail cameras, giving you plenty to look forward to on safari with us this year.

On behalf of my team I would once again like to thank each and every one of you for your hospitality, friendship and support. Ngiyabonga. Dankie. Re a Leboga. Ke a Leboha Haholo. Ndza Nkhensa. Ndo Livhuwa. Enkosi. Thank you – We could not have done it without you.

It’s time to get out there. We’re ready for your arrival – See you on safari!

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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Back by Popular Demand – The most popular shots from last season…

With our travels across the US in full swing we have been blown away by the sheer popularity of the past season’s safari videos. The fine balance between the actual hunt and the overall safari experience is one that at times can be very hard to capture, as one cannot always predict the precise moment when something amazing is about to be witnessed. Wildlife has a way of surprising one when you least expect it. BUT in saying that, more often than not the unexpected just happens and those are the true moments that shout out AFRICA louder than any.

Our crew on the ground from Got The Shot Productions headed up by Ozzy filmed and produced some of the most amazing scenes during 2017, capturing the true essence of a hunt with John X Safaris. By popular demand here are a few of our most viewed safari videos from the past season.

Starting us off is Cable Smith on his first safari to the Dark Continent. Cable is the host of Lone Star Outdoor Radio and a guy we’ve come to know a whole lot better since his safari. Join him as he got to experience Africa from a first timers perspective, and don’t miss his Warthog “rodeo”. It’s been one of the most asked about hunts from 2017!

Or join the Smith family as they braved some extreme elements hunting plains game from both our southern and northern concessions. This father/son duo made the most of our youth hunting initiative and came away with a host of experiences hard to match anywhere else in the world.

Or jump on board with us as we leave the East Cape in South Africa and travel to West Africa. Cameroon and the Giant Eland has been a bucket list safari for many of us for as long as we can remember. Our old friends, Luther Dietrich and Jeff Edland, joined Professional Hunters, Mike Currie and Carl van Zyl, on this hunt of a lifetime. Hunting Lord Derby Eland is not for the faint hearted…

These are just a few from 2017, there are a whole bunch more on our YouTube Channel to enjoy over the coming weeks.

If any of our booked hunters for 2018 would like to have their safari filmed then don’t hesitate to reach us on hunting@johnxsafaris.co.za . GTS Productions are at your service every step of your hunt, shot for shot, sight for sight, and sound for sound. Take Africa home with you as you share your experience with family and friends.

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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As one meanders through the maze that is an outdoor show today, and one researches the internet or the various social media platforms looking at the variety of options available to the hunter, you could be forgiven for feeling slightly overwhelmed. Let’s face it, the risk vs reward on what you spend and what you get for your precious time away from your “real world” and your hard-earned dollars play a major role in the decisions you make. You want the very best experience that you can afford, yet you’d like to feel the reward at a level much higher than what money can truly buy.

Why Africa?

The options are plentiful. From the vastness of Alaska to the breath-taking beauty of New Zealand, or the endless birds of South America. The hills of Old Mexico, or the plains of the mid-west to the outback of Australia or the forests of Europe. There is an array of destinations entwined in a lifestyle that reeks of adventure as one plans one trip after another. There is a bug that bites the traveling hunter, one that knows no cure, with Africa biting the worst of all.

It is the dark continent… the original destination of adventurers and explorers. A place of rich culture, abundant wildlife, unimaginable landscapes and bright orange sunsets. A place where the hunter can marvel in the opportunities of a bygone era and become a part of something impossible to describe. It’s a deeper understanding, yet a greater mystery at why Africa remains the ultimate hunt of all.

Why John X Safaris and not the Competition?

After 35 years we’ve come to know a thing or two about safaris, in particular YOUR hunt. We’re not merely talking the talk without walking the walk. We’ve spent two generations perfecting the balance between results and experiences.

We’ve taken the cream of the industry and combined them into a team that is envy of the competition. We challenged ourselves to think bigger, hunt smarter and conserve greater. We took 1 million acres and said it wasn’t enough to take us where we want to go with your safari. We extended ourselves to take on more land than what we envisaged, to ensure we not only met your expectations, but exceeded them.

We’ve invested, established and sustainably covered the entire East Cape, SA. From the coastal forests along the Indian Ocean, to the unsurpassed beauty of the Great Karoo, and the breath-taking mountains of the north. It’s a diverse combination of landscapes, vegetation and wildlife, together making for a unique destination for the safari enthusiast to Africa.

We’ve got a lot to offer….

We’re an outfit that welcomes all hunters, no matter what your age, physical condition or hunting capabilities. We offer both plains and dangerous game in large fenced or free range areas. Our lodging is second to none, giving you or your group the choice of three different lodges/areas in the East Cape. This allows us to offer the game in their natural environment where they are naturally of better quality.

We cater to the traditional hunter, the bow enthusiast or the long-range addict. We do so under fair-chase principles, ensuring both you and us are proud of how we conduct ourselves as passionate hunters.

We want you to bring along the family, welcoming observers and prioritizing their experiences as much as we do yours. We enjoy sharing your hunt with you and we get excited about your better half or the youngsters taking up this past time we hold so dear.

We’re quite capable of filling the salt pit to your requirements, but we prefer the quality of your hunted game to be our trademark and the given, while the experiences created far outweigh that of the shots fired. It’s not about today, it’s about tomorrow and the sustainability of our wildlife for future generations.

So what should I hunt?

You’re a beginner, start with plains game on our Single or Multi Area Hunts – Make the most of our traditional 7/10 Day Hunts in the East Cape. Our hunts are offered at a daily rate basis, allowing you to tailor-make your very own safari as per your specie choices or preferences.

Why not bring the kids along? We’re passionate about the next generation of hunters. In fact, we’re so passionate we’ve taken it upon ourselves to match your investment in their hunt, ultimately our hunting future, by matching the cost of getting them to Africa. We figured if you were willing to buy the flight we’d be happy to sponsor the day fee with our Get the Youth Hunting Initiative – Bring your son/daughter/any minor along on their spring/summer break and we’ll comp his/her day fee. Only pay for trophies.

You’ve hunted plains game and you’re ready for the Big 5. There’s no better place to start than Cape Buffalo from our main base Woodlands Safari Estate. Arguably the best Buffalo hunting in the EC, the area comprises of 30 000 acres of hunting territory. Our package comes in at $15000 (All Inclusive + 1 Trophy Cape Buffalo) for either 7 or 10 days of hunting, your choice. Feel free to add or subtract any extra game as you wish.

So you enjoyed the plains game to begin with, you loved your Cape Buffalo hunt, so what’s next? Could there possibly be anything more to hunt in the East Cape? Most certainly! You haven’t started with the Tiny 10 have you? We’re the team hunters turn to when it comes to their Tiny 10 collections. From Oribi to the elusive Blue Duiker and everything in between.

Then there’s the mountains. It’s addictive and we live for Mountain Hunts in Africa – You’re an altitude hunting enthusiast? Then we’ve got the hunt for you in Africa. Vaal Rhebuck, Klipspringer and Mnt Reedbuck. There’s no one with more experience and larger/better areas when it comes to hunting the high country in Africa. Our track record speaks for itself.

You’re three or four hunts in with John X Safaris so where to next? You’ve built up a friendship through experiences with your PH that speaks louder than words, you’re not ready to just say goodbye to your family in Africa. Why not join us on one of our Out of Country Hunts? We’ve got the contacts and the know-how, it’s taken us more than thirty years, but we’ve got the areas and the game you’re after. Best of all your best friend, and African PH, will be going along to ensure you achieve the results you’ve become accustomed to with us over the years. Choose from Cameroon, Ethiopia, Congo, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia or Mozambique.

The Differentiator

We’re not for everyone. We prefer not chasing the numbers, but rather the experiences, in that manner the numbers take care of themselves and the sustainability of our wildlife. We’re not trying to be the biggest, but merely the best. We’re not interested in treating you like a client and your hunt like a business, it’s about you and your passion and the friendships built through camaraderie on safari in Africa. This is who we are.

Want to join us on safari?

We’d like to hear from you on hunting@johnxsafaris.co.za or alternatively call Carl Van Zyl on US Cell +1 682 226 2202 or PH Ross ‘Stix’ Hoole on +1 806 316 6060. We’d gladly assist by dropping you a mail, giving you a call or visiting you in your home state.

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website!

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During the latter part of July, right towards the very end of the rut in the East Cape, we welcomed Cable Smith to John X Safaris and Africa for the very first time. Cable owns the Lone Star Outdoor radio show, broadcasting throughout Texas on various local radio stations weekly. He is a passionate man, an outdoor enthusiast who speaks his mind, fearless of anti-hunters and that fraternity, making him an invaluable asset to hunters right around the world.

Having met Cable via our great friends, Glynn Underwood and Steve Travis, at the Dallas Safari Club convention during 2015, we soon got talking about the Dark Continent. Cable had heard so much about the destination and his friends were adamant he had to get to Africa.

Soon plans were put in motion and before we knew it Cable had touched down in Africa, joining PH, Carl van Zyl and team, on safari in the East Cape.

Sporting his custom-built, Horizon Firearms 7 mm, we set off after plains game, hunting a variety of both Carl and Cable’s favorite species.

Of course there would be a Kudu on the wish list, but first we started off from Woodlands Safari Estate hunting our Southern Concessions for Impala and Zebra.

The Kudu were done rutting in the south, with reports of bulls still chasing cows in the cold country, which had seen a later start to their rut this season. With that we headed north up into the hills, climbing the escarpment to 4500 feet. Our main goal was to hunt Kudu, with anything else coming as a bonus along the way. We got up high and found ourselves a beauty!

With a Kudu in the salt, and the pressure well and truly off, having got lucky on our first morning in the north, we decided to stay a few more days. Carl wanted to scratch around for a nice Warthog. If only we knew what that scratching would literally mean, let alone the next few days harvesting not only a superb pig that turned out to be one unbelievable adventure, but a Mountain Reedbuck like we’ve never seen before.

With a feeling of accomplishment we headed south again. The salt pit was full and so too were our appetites. In the coming days we would be after Africa’s biggest and one of Africa’s sneakiest.

An Eland, a couple of Wildebeest and a Hartebeest, would consume the remainder of our time on safari. Of course it was only a matter of time before we hit a blank, which proved to be our Cape Bushbuck. Our safari had run so smoothly, with pretty much everything we touched turning to gold, except for the Bushbuck which we’ll try for again in June 2018 and that pig… Oh did I mention that adventure turned out to be a rodeo. You want to see this to believe it….

Any Lone Star Outdoor Show fans and interested hunters wanting to join Cable on safari come 2018, can do so by contacting Cable on lonestaroutdoorshow@gmail.com or Carl on hunting@johnxsafaris.co.za . Our dates are set for 22-30 June 2018, with only a couple of remaining spots left.

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website.

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Ten years have passed since last I visited Tanzania. We hunted the famous Selous Game Reserve on that particular safari, coming away with a host of great animals, most notably the biggest Cape Buffalo hunted in the Selous that year.

A brute of a bull breaking the magical 45″ mark, finally scoring 47″.

After that initial hunt, things changed in Tanzania, with the dramatic up listing of rates and various tax laws playing the biggest role to why we had not returned to hunt this breath-taking country again. Over the course of those ten years our hunters chose South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Namibia, and Zambia.  But then 2016 came around and I received my annual “hunt planning” mail from my great friend, Steve Travis.

“I’m turning 50 buddy! I want to go Tanzania. I’ve always dreamt about it. Can you put something together?”

This was the big 5!0! Soon we had some options on the table and then we booked the hunt with Jaco Oosthuizen from Game Trackers Africa – our hosts in Tanzania.

We planned to hunt the Moyowasi/Kigozi Game Reserve, situated in Tanzania’s north-western corner up against Burundi and Rwanda. Our block would be the Kigozi unit with its miombo forests and central flood plain playing host to both big 5 and plains game. We were booked and now the waiting game began as we ticked off the days and months leading up to late September 2017.

Hunting has a way of picking you up, giving you hope…. and then spitting you out.

We had arrived to Dar Es Salaam on September 15, I had flown in from South Africa, while Steve came via Europe, stopping over in Nairobi, Kenya, along the way.

With plans set for us to catch a charter out the following morning we were thrown a massive curve ball by United Airlines, who had left Steve’s bags and ammo in Chicago, while they sent the rifles along without a hassle in the world. As ridiculous as that sounds, but there we were – stuck in Dar waiting for luggage.

Meanwhile Steve’s wife Haylee was being a champ back home working the airlines overtime trying to speed up the bag delivery. By noon that first day we made a call to fly out commercially to Mwanza, situated on the shores of Lake Victoria.

We finally got in late that evening and woke the next morning to the amazing sights and sounds of the largest lake in Africa – and then caught our charter to Kigozi. The bags would follow in days to come.

The first few days saw us exploring the area and getting to see the various species of game. We spotted East African Kudu, Topi, Roan, Sable, East African Bushbuck, Lichtenstein Hartebeest, Giraffe, Spotted Hyena, Bohor Reedbuck, Honey Badger, Sitatunga, Warthog, Bushpig, Baboon, Vervet Monkey, Oribi, Duiker, plenty of Bush babies on our way back to camp in the evenings, and of course Cape Buffalo.

The place is beautiful with amazing sun rises and sunsets, and is a game rich area compared to many other Tanzanian concessions. Seeing game does however not mean you’re killing game when it comes to concession hunting. By the end of day four we had not bothered the skinners yet. Let’s say we were desperate for action. The entire crew were working extremely hard, trying everything possible to break our run of bad luck.

Most mornings we would rise at 4:30 am, getting back in the evenings between 21-22:00. Sleep was not a priority, but still our luck wouldn’t break.

On day five we decided to give the plains game a break and concentrate on Steve’s all-time favourite, Cape Buffalo. We stuck to our routine, wasting no time on any other game along the way and headed deep into the swamp.

And just when you thought you had been spat out, the hunting gods smile down on you…

We hadn’t spotted much until about noon, when suddenly three old Dugga boys appeared on the distant horizon. Desperate for action we set off on a long stalk.

Soon we were in range and then all hell broke loose. First the bull on the right, then the bull in the middle, and then the bull on the left. In a matter of two minutes Steve had done it again.

He had tagged out with three Buffalo in the matter of twenty minutes on the flood plains of Mozambique, and now had done so again in Tanzania. A feat I thought I’d never see, let alone see repeated again by the same guy.

With the Buffalo firmly in the salt plans took a whole new course. We now had meat, lots of it, and a Leopard suddenly became a hot topic of debate.

Soon we were hanging baits, a Leopard was on the cards.

With the baits hung we headed back out to the swamps for Sitatunga, giving the various baits time to attract our desired quarry.

It turned out to be a long morning in the swamps with no opportunities on the much-anticipated Sitatunga, it did however provide us with magnificent pictures of these shy, and rarely photographed animals.

Before leaving camp that morning we had made an arrangement with Dennis, the camp manager to clock in at 11am via satellite phone. We had left Baraka and Chumani to check baits.

After only one night we had a hit. Baraka was excited, urging us on to get out of the swamps and start heading towards the struck bait. He on the other hand would start collecting material to get the blind built. It would be a race against the clock. The guys knew this old Tom well. He first came to bait 3 years ago, at that stage he was already a big cat. He had a habit of feeding constantly for the first two to three evenings, but then became sporadic. We needed to get in that evening.

The team pulled together like a well-oiled machine, and by 17:00 we were in the blind.

As the birds went about their business like they do in Africa each evening, getting ready for the night ahead, we sat in silence, listing for anything that may give away the Leopards presence. At first it was the Spur Fowl and then the Guinea Fowl, they sounded nervous, he was here … but we couldn’t see him. We sat in silence, barely breathing as the sweat dripped from our brows in the blistering hot blind.

And then just as we started wondering if he’d be in during the required day light hours, the sound of nails digging deep into the bark of a tree broke the silence around us. He was on the bait.

He paused for a second, looking around nervously, and then confidently lay down and started feeding. There were two cats in the area, a male and female, and while this cat looked like a beast, we still had to make certain he was a legal male, giving Steve the opportunity to enjoy viewing this beautiful animal.

I’m sure it was mere minutes, but it felt like hours, he just lay there feeding, and all this time the sun was setting. Legal shooting time was running out. And then he got up and there was no doubting it was him.

Steve got the go-ahead. At the thunder of his 416 Rigby the Leopard disappeared out of sight, and all we could hear was the sound of the grass breaking in our direction with a few deep grumbles. And then there was silence. We sat quietly giving him time, making sure he was down. A wounded Leopard is no walk in the park, and we weren’t up for a walk with an irate cat.

Steve had hit him two inches back, taking out both lungs, and in the process earning a cat of some magnitude.

A beast well past his prime, carrying the battle scars of a Tom on his way out. Down in condition he still weighed in at over 170 pounds with a tip to tail measurement of 8 feet 9″. A once in a lifetime cat.

With our cat in the back we headed to camp in the chorus of the crew chanting away “Kabubi-Kabubi!” The festivities had begun!

We woke the following morning still in awe at what we had achieved. So much had changed in two days. At the start of day 5 our spirits were down and out, now Steve was back – he had to dig deep inside to really find out how badly he wanted it. He found it. And we went back Sitatunga hunting.

Our efforts once again came up empty-handed, but we did manage to hunt a great Topi on the way back to camp that evening.

With time running out we gave the Sitatunga our all on day nine. Many a hunter has left Africa without a Sitatunga. We weren’t planning on Steve being one of those. Their numbers were excellent in the area we were hunting, we just needed to find the right patch of papyrus.

After two drives we hadn’t seen a big bull, when Triphone, one of the trackers suggested a small patch of papyrus off in the distance. He had a good feeling about it. We went with his gut instinct and Steve literally became one of the luckiest hunters I know.

Our last day was spent looking for a Hippo, with a nice Lichtenstein Hartebeest crossing our path late that last afternoon, but the swamps proved to be too tough a terrain to hunt a weary old Hippo bull. We had used up our luck you could say. And that was fine for all involved. That’s why we hunt. You enjoy the good times when the hard yards had you doubting yourself and the process involved. It was time to catch our charter… western Tanzania had spoiled us for quality in both scenery, wildlife, and experiences.

In closing I’d like to thank Jaco and his crew. You guys were professional and a pleasure to work with in the field. From Suleiman, who met us upon arrival in Dar Es Salaam to Dennis our camp manager and Baraka our Masai tracker, aka the Dugga Boy. Thomas was our driver, come mechanic, come magic man. This guy will put any first world mechanical workshop to shame right in the middle of nowhere with a tool box and a couple of bottles of oil for good measure. Chumani who ran the other truck daily, putting in as much effort as every crew member on our truck, never once stopped smiling, making him an asset to all around.  Our senior tracker, Ntacho, aka the boss, as we fondly renamed him, was a man cut from a different cloth. At 62 he could run, climb, jump, drive Sitatunga and Hippo all day long through the papyrus infected swamp, while still providing us with untold laughter and fun along the way. We’re still hoping to convince him to part take in the Senior Olympics – a special guy to say the least. There were so many more to thank who kept the show on the road, but these guys made all the difference daily. Thank you so much.

Then last but not least, to a friend like few, Steve Travis – Happy birthday mate. This one tested us to the point of breaking, but once again we met the challenge head on, coming away with an experience worth a 50th celebration. Thanks for the memories… here’s to you and many more.

For more information and current updates about John X Safaris; follow us on Twitter, connect with us on Facebook, subscribe to our YouTube Channel and visit our Website

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